The Templars in America.

Discussion in 'History' started by Mindful, Jun 11, 2019.

  1. OldLady
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    OldLady Diamond Member

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    Good luck getting a straight answer out of her.
     
  2. bodecea
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    bodecea Diamond Member

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    Yes...disease travels faster than human exploration.
     
  3. Mindful
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    Mindful Platinum Member

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    So you have to spoil it?

    Too bad. I should have known.
     
  4. bodecea
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    bodecea Diamond Member

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    Huh? Why wouldn't I?
     
  5. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Award Winning USMB Paid Messageboard Poster

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    No, they didn’t
     
  6. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Polishprince
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    Polishprince Gold Member

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    IMHO, probably not.

    De Molay passed away in 1307, and the story you linked indicated they came over at the end of the 14th Century 70 or 80 years after?

    Not likely they would all be dead. And since the Templars were an all-male outfit, they had to recruit new generations.
     
  8. Mindful
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    Mindful Platinum Member

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    Would they, or anyone else for that matter, have been capable of sailing over to the American continent, with whatever boating technology they might have possessed at that time in history?
     
  9. Picaro
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    Picaro Gold Member

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    Yes. Easily. The major problem is knowing which way you're going and where you are at any given time, not the distance by itself. And, there are ocean currents and wind patterns to sort out, etc. Long voyages were pretty common long before Columbus's times; Asian ones took years, sometimes.

    Even in the Med, you have a relatively short travel time from Rome to Egypt, for instance, but the return trip is an entirely different story when using sailing craft. This was a major factor and required major planning and organizing every year for the Roman grain ships voyages, a critical key project for Roman leadership for hundreds of years. As long as you were successful at getting the ships to and from Rome, you could get away with a lot, which is why Romans put up with some real assholes as Emperors while others got deposed for little reason.

    The main reason North America remained 'undiscovered' was simply economics; it had little to offer as a trade route until a large market for furs developed in Europe, and the need for timber; before that it's primary attraction was as a place for Europe to dump dissenters and religious 'cranks'. Getting to South America and Central America was actually easier, due to the currents and prevailing winds.

    Another good book on history of sailing is Lionel Caisson's The Ancient Mariners; it's fairly short and a good intro into the issues of water travel.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
  10. Mindful
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    Mindful Platinum Member

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    Thankyou. I shall look into that book.

    I actually visited Columbus's house in the Canary Isles, which is now a museum. Packed full of interesting and informative stuff.

    Charts, routes, even a cross section reproduction of the ship he would have sailed in.

    Another book I've read is the Kon-Tiki Expedition. An account of Thor Heyerdahl's voyage by raft from South America to Polynesia.


    ^Heyerdahl believed that people from South America could have settled Polynesia in pre-Columbian times. His aim in mounting the Kon-Tiki expedition was to show, by using only the materials and technologies available to those people at the time, that there were no technical reasons to prevent them from having done so. Although the expedition carried some modern equipment, such as a radio, watches, charts, sextant, and metal knives, Heyerdahl argued they were incidental to the purpose of proving that the raft itself could make the journey. ~ Wiki.
     
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